Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Frequency Help

  1. #1

    Default Frequency Help

    wasn't sure where to post this but... i found this on a site and was like, "yeah maybe the folks at CP could make use out of it"... so yeah anyway it's help with frequencies... check it out...

    FREQUENCY:

    USES:

    50Hz

    1. Increase to add more fullness to lowest frequency instruments like foot, toms, and the bass.
    2. Reduce to decrease the "boom" of the bass and will increase overtones and the recognition of bass line in the mix. This is most often used on loud bass lines like rock.

    100Hz

    1. Increase to add a harder bass sound to lowest frequency instruments.
    2. Increase to add fullness to guitars, snare.
    3. Increase to add warmth to piano and horns.
    4. Reduce to remove boom on guitars & increase clarity.

    200Hz

    1. Increase to add fullness to vocals.
    2. Increase to add fullness to snare and guitar ( harder sound ).
    3. Reduce to decrease muddiness of vocals or mid-range instruments.
    4. Reduce to decrease gong sound of cymbals.

    400Hz

    1. Increase to add clarity to bass lines especially when speakers are at low volume.
    2. Reduce to decrease "cardboard" sound of lower drums (foot and toms).
    3. Reduce to decrease ambiance on cymbals.

    800Hz

    1. Increase for clarity and "punch" of bass.
    2. Reduce to remove "cheap" sound of guitars.

    1.5KHz

    1. Increase for "clarity" and "pluck" of bass.
    2. Reduce to remove dullness of guitars.

    3KHz

    1. Increase for more "pluck" of bass.
    2. Increase for more attack of electric / acoustic guitar.
    3. Increase for more attack on low piano parts.
    4. Increase for more clarity / hardness on voice.
    5. Reduce to increase breathy, soft sound on background vocals.
    6. Reduce to disguise out-of-tune vocals / guitars.

    5KHz

    1. Increase for vocal presence.
    2. Increase low frequency drum attack ( foot / toms).
    3. Increase for more "finger sound" on bass.
    4. Increase attack of piano, acoustic guitar and brightness on guitars (especially rock guitars).
    5. Reduce to make background parts more distant.
    6. Reduce to soften "thin" guitar.

    7KHz

    1. Increase to add attack on low frequency drums ( more metallic sound ).
    2. Increase to add attack to percussion instruments.
    3. Increase on dull singer.
    4. Increase for more "finger sound" on acoustic bass.
    5. Reduce to decrease "s" sound on singers.
    6. Increase to add sharpness to synthesizers, rock guitars, acoustic guitar and piano.

    10KHz

    1. Increase to brighten vocals.
    2. Increase for "light brightness" in acoustic guitar and piano.
    3. Increase for hardness on cymbals.
    4. Reduce to decrease "s" sound on singers.

    15KHz

    1. Increase to brighten vocals (breath sound).
    2. Increase to brighten cymbals, string instruments and flutes.
    3. Increase to make sampled synthesizer sound more real.

    [img][/img]

    "Problems are the price you pay for progress."

  2. #2
    Livin the Atheist life Cesare Borgia's Avatar
    Join Date
    29 Nov 2004
    Location
    Westcoast USA
    Age
    33
    Posts
    5,930

    Default Re: +++ 000 ---- Frequency Help

    good lookin on this man, i just copyed it for next time im recording, mabee i can touch up them vocals.

  3. #3

    Default Re: +++ 000 ---- Frequency Help

    no prob.. i got some other ones... should i post em?

    [img][/img]

    "Problems are the price you pay for progress."

  4. #4
    Livin the Atheist life Cesare Borgia's Avatar
    Join Date
    29 Nov 2004
    Location
    Westcoast USA
    Age
    33
    Posts
    5,930

    Default Re: +++ 000 ---- Frequency Help

    Yea if u want, every little bit helps.

  5. #5

    Default Re: +++ 000 ---- Frequency Help

    yeah...props...post the other shit too. It'll be appreciated.

  6. #6
    Administrator Crazy Pellas's Avatar
    Join Date
    25 Nov 2004
    Location
    Glasgow, Scotland
    Age
    29
    Posts
    24,136

    Default Re: +++ 000 ---- Frequency Help

    would this not be better in the Producer Talk forum?
    Iain Meddicks
    Founder of CrazyPellas / SendBeatsTo - Track what happens with your beats after you've sent them.

    Send me a message if you have any questions, or suggestions =]

    Like Us on Facebook / Follow Us on Twitter


    Official BlackWallStreet and Nu Jerzey Devil Gear

  7. #7
    Livin the Atheist life Cesare Borgia's Avatar
    Join Date
    29 Nov 2004
    Location
    Westcoast USA
    Age
    33
    Posts
    5,930

    Default Re: Frequency Help

    I left it here because its usefull for producers, DJs and MC's, should i move it?

  8. #8
    Silent Productions ThugLife's Avatar
    Join Date
    06 Dec 2004
    Location
    Vancouver, Canada
    Age
    29
    Posts
    3,727

    Default Re: Frequency Help

    I was lookin for something about frequency
    post more

  9. #9

    Default Re: Frequency Help

    ill post a few more... cp maybe you should sticky this somewhere

    [img][/img]

    "Problems are the price you pay for progress."

  10. #10
    Administrator Crazy Pellas's Avatar
    Join Date
    25 Nov 2004
    Location
    Glasgow, Scotland
    Age
    29
    Posts
    24,136

    Default Re: Frequency Help

    simple solution, create a new forum

    Talent Discussions
    Iain Meddicks
    Founder of CrazyPellas / SendBeatsTo - Track what happens with your beats after you've sent them.

    Send me a message if you have any questions, or suggestions =]

    Like Us on Facebook / Follow Us on Twitter


    Official BlackWallStreet and Nu Jerzey Devil Gear

  11. #11
    LOOK THERE ===> chrome's Avatar
    Join Date
    14 Dec 2005
    Location
    Belgium
    Age
    27
    Posts
    3,041

    Default Re: Frequency Help

    some body asked for more and i got more this is a first thing i got( props 2 who wrote it)

    1) Know what to boost & where to boost - Too many amateur mixers think just because they've discovered a low frequency EQ knob, and know how to turn it up, that they've suddenly become an expert on Equalization. The truth is there isn't a quicker way to ruin a mix than EQing your tracks using the same global EQ boosts. A professional mixer quickly understands that while boosting the same low frequency on a bass guitar as that on a kick drum may sound great when listened separate from each other, when combined the cumulative EQ creates an overall loss of output volume for the entire mix due to lows controlling the mix level.

    2) Give each track it's own timbre - A professional mixer understands to avoid using the same frequencies when EQing each track in a mix. In fact, by making sure each track has it's own proper & unique EQ settings, you're overall mix will sound more professional, balanced, and louder. To take it a step further, clearing out frequency ranges with low pass and high pass filters on tracks that don't fill the entire frequency spectrum grants you more control over boosting & cutting EQ where it is needed. For example, opening up the low end of the spectrum with high pass filtering so kick drums and bass can fill in with more definition, as well as, opening up the highs with low pass filtering where cymbals and hi-hats can be heard more clearly.

    3) Compensate: Where you boost, you must cut - A professional mixer understands that where he/she boosts, he/she must cut. For example, if your kick drum needs more lows, then give it a 4db boost around 60hz. But...be certain to compensate this boost with a corresponding cut by subtracting the same 60hz from your bass guitar track. Furthermore, before creating unwanted cumulative EQ effects by boosting lower mids on your congas or toms, clear out the EQ path by high passing tracks that don't use natural low mids such as strings, hi hats, and background vocals. By boosting where you cut & cutting where you boost, you keep the overall EQ spectrum balanced. The results will astonish you. Your overall mix will be more balanced, smoother, and best of all - Hotter!

    - Equalizers are one of the most over looked and mis-used pieces of gear in the audio industry. By understanding equalizers better, an engineer can control and get the results he or she is looking for. The key to EQ'ing is knowing how to get the results you are looking for. Also, knowing if its a mic character or mic placement problem. EQ can't fix everything. It can only change what signal its working with. Equalizers are also a lot more effective taking away things in the signal than replacing what was never there

  12. #12
    LOOK THERE ===> chrome's Avatar
    Join Date
    14 Dec 2005
    Location
    Belgium
    Age
    27
    Posts
    3,041

    Default Re: Frequency Help

    Another helpfull text.(again props to who wrote it)

    FX from EQ'in

    Mic'ing instruments is an art ... and equalizers can often times be used to help an engineer get the sound he is looking for. Many instruments have complex sounds with radiating patterns that make it almost impossible to capture when close mic'ing. An equalizer can compensate for these imbalances by accenting some frequencies and rolling off others. The goal is to capture the sounds as natural as possible and use equalizers to straighten out any non-linear qualities to the tones.
    Clarity of many instruments can be improved by boosting their harmonics. In fact, the ear in many cases actually fills in hard-to-hear fundamental notes of sounds, provided the harmonics are clear. Drums are one instrument that can be effectively lifted and cleaned up simply by rolling off the bass giving way to more harmonic tones.
    Here are a few ideas on what different frequencies do to sounds and their effects on our ears.
    ----------------------------------------------------
    -31Hz to 50Hz - These frequencies give music a sense of power. If over emphasized they can make things muddy and dull. Will also cloudy up some harmonic content.

    -80Hz to 125Hz - Too much in this area produces excessive 'boom'.

    -160Hz to 250Hz - This is the problem area of a lot of mixes. To much of this area can take away from the power of a mix but is still needed for warmth. 160Hz is a pet-peeve frequency of mine. Also, the fundamental of bass guitar and other bass instruments sit here.

    -300Hz to 500Hz - Fundamentals of string and percussion instruments.

    -400Hz to 1K - Fundamentals and harmonics of strings, keyboards and percussion. This is probably the most important area when trying to control or shape to a natural sound. The 'voice' of an instrument is in the mids.

    To much in this area can make instruments sound horn-like.

    -800Hz to 4k - This is a good range to accentuate instruments or warm them up. Too much in this area can produce 'listening fatigue'. Boosts in the 1K to 2K range can make instruments sound tinny.

    -4K to 10K - Accentuation of percussion, cymbals, and snare drum.

    Playing with 5K makes the overall sound more distant or transparent.

    -8K to 20K - This area is often what defines the quality of a recording or mix. This area can also help define depth and 'air' to mix. Too much can take away from the natural sense of a mix by becoming shrill and brittle.

  13. #13
    LOOK THERE ===> chrome's Avatar
    Join Date
    14 Dec 2005
    Location
    Belgium
    Age
    27
    Posts
    3,041

    Default Re: Frequency Help

    And this is the last i have(props 2 who wrote it)

    Instrument EQ'in

    Kick Drum:
    Besides the usual cuts in the 200Hz to 400 area, some tighter Q cuts at 160Hz, 800Hz and 1.3k may help. The point of these cuts makes for space for the fundamental tones of a bass guitar or stand up. I have also found a high pass filter at 50Hz will help tighten up the kick along with giving your compressor a signal it can deal with musically. 5K to 7K for snap.

    Snare Drum:
    The snare drum is an instrument that can really be clouded by having too much low end. Frequencies under about 150Hz are really un-usable for modern mixing styles. I would suggest a high pass filter in this case. Most snares are out front enough so a few cuts might be all that is needed. I like to start with 400Hz, 800Hz, and some 1.3K. This are just frequencies to play with. Doesn't mean you will use all. If the snare is too transparent in the mix but I like the level it is at, a cut at 5K can give it a little more distance and that might mean a little boost at 10K to brighten it up.

    High Hats:
    High hats have very little low end information. I high pass at 200Hz can clean up a lot of un-usable mud in regards to mic bleed. The mid tones are the most important to a high hat. This will mean the 400Hz to 1K area but I've found the 600Hz to 800Hz area to be the most effective. To brighten up high hats, a shelving filter at 12.5K does nicely.

    Toms and Floor Toms:
    Again, the focus here is control. Most toms could use a cut in the 300Hz to 800Hz area. And there is nothing real usable under 100Hz for a tom... unless you are going for a special effect. Too much low end cloud up harmonics and the natural tones of the instrument. Think color not big low end.

    Over Heads:
    In my opinion, drum over heads are the most important mics on a drum kit. They are the ones that really define the sound of the drums. That also give the kit some ambience and space. These mics usually need a cut in the 400Hz area and can use a good rolling off at about 150Hz. Again, they are not used for power.... these mics 'are' the color of your drum sound. Roll off anything that will mask harmonic content or make your drums sound dull. Cuts at 800Hz can bring more focus to these mics and a little boost of a shelving filter at 12.5K can bring some air to the tones as well.

    Bass Guitar:
    Bass guitar puts out all the frequencies that you really don't want on every other instrument. The clarity of bass is defined a lot at 800Hz. Too much low end can mask the clarity of a bass line. I've heard other say that the best way to shape the bass tone is to roll off everything below 150Hz, mold the mids into the tone you are looking for, then slowly roll the low end back in until the power and body is there you are looking for. If the bass isn't defined enough, there is probably too much low end and not enough mid range clarity. Think of sounds in a linear fashion, like on a graph. If there is too much bass and no clarity, you would see a bump in the low end masking the top end. The use of EQ can fix those abnormalities.

    Guitar/piano/ etc.:
    These instruments all have fundamentals in the mid range. Rolling off low end that is not needed or usable is a good idea. Even if you feel you can't really hear the low end, it still is doing something to the mix. Low end on these instruments give what I call support. The tone is in the mids. 400Hz and 800Hz are usually a point of interest as are the upper mids or 1K to 5K. Anything above that just adds brightness. Remember to look at perspective though. Is a kick brighter than a vocal? Is a piano bright than a vocal? Is a cymbal brighter than a vocal?

  14. #14

    Default Re: Frequency Help

    props man... i was getting ready to post up the same thing... saved me the trouble tho... props

    [img][/img]

    "Problems are the price you pay for progress."

  15. #15
    Heroin Addict JPimpitone's Avatar
    Join Date
    25 Jan 2006
    Location
    St. Louis
    Age
    35
    Posts
    923

    Default Re: Frequency Help

    Chromes first post was tips from modernbeats... not sure about the others tho, lotta good info

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
About CrazyPellas

CrazyPellas is a great music community that was founded in 2004, for Artists, DJs and Producers to Upload Music, Share Music and Get Feedback on your Music. We are constantly striving to improve CrazyPellas and ask you to contact us if you have any suggestions or if their is anything that we can help you with.

Connect With Us