Willie D. Minor

Hello,

my name is Willie D. Minor. I was born in Tuscaloosa, Alabama on March 6, 1973. I am an African-American, 5'3'' tall, 155 lbs, black hair, brown eyes.

I am currently on death row and looking for a pen friend.

Willie D. Minor
Z 606
W.D.C.F. 5-81
100 Warrior Lane
Bessemer, AL 35023-7299
USA

Hundreds of innocent people go to jail or prison each year because of public pressure, altered evidence, lack of money, ignorance, and public apathy.

I am one of themÖ

Introduction

Greetings. My Name is Willie D. Minor. A Tuscaloosa County Grand Jury indicted me for the murder of my son, Eíbious Jennings. The indictment in this case charged me with the intentional murder of my son, a child under fourteen years of age, and thus a capital felony charge. On September 22, 1995, I entered a plea of not-guilty. On February 6, 2001, a jury returned a guilty verdict. On March 17, 2001, I was sentenced to death for a crime I did not commit.

Our press delights in frightening so-called model citizens with reports of crime until the public is influenced to the degree in style at the time. Few people are aware of the devastating and immoral acts of some politicians. In only a matter of minutes you can become aware of the total insanity of the judicial systemís need to incarcerate. We often hide behind the need for closure and justice, blinded to the outrageous behavior of our law enforcement officials and petty laws designed to break the poor.

Any assistance or support you may be able to give will be greatly appreciated. This is a matter of life and death. Thank you.

In Solidarity

Willie D. Minor

Questionable Evidence

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The stateís case against Minor was based on inconsistent, contradictory and confusing facts. First there is a lack of certainty as to the direct cause of the victimís death. It is unclear whether the victimís bone fractures were sustained the night he died or whether they were the result of earlier injuries. When the victim was treated in the emergency room the night of his death, a doctor examined the X-rays and remarked that the fractures looked old. During the trial, Lakeisha Jennings (the victimís mother), admitted that Eíbious had previously fallen off the couch on the day of his death.

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Also at the trial, a Dr. Evans testified that Eíbious suffered at a minimum, three traumatic events including severe shaking, a blow or blows to the head, and a blow or blows to the abdomen, but that he didnít obtain any external injuries. A Dr. Warner indicated that the cause of Eíbiousí death was a blunt-force trauma to the head and chest, in addition to brain damage. However, a Dr. Whitley testified for the defense that neither the exact cause, nor time, of death could be determined. He stated that the nature of the injuries indicated that they occurred six to eight hours prior to Eíbiousí being taken to the hospital. Minor was not present at that time, and did not have the child in his custody. Because the time of the injuries was not conclusively established, a question remains as to the circumstances surrounding the victimís death.

Inconsistencies

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The testimony of the stateís main witness, Jennings, changed several times over the course of the investigation. Jennings made a statement after the victimís death that Minor met her at the door holding the victim. At trial, however, she testified that the victim was lying in the bed when she came home.

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Jennings also stated that she never hit the victimís head on the door frame on the way out of the apartment the night the victim died. However, Dr. Vetter, a state witness, testified that Jennings said the victimís head had, in fact, hit the doorframe in her rush to the hospital. This is critical because other state witnesses testified that the victimís injuries could be consistent with Jennings hitting the victimís head on the doorframe.

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Several important state witnesses, including Jennings, "remembered" facts and evidence long after the victimís death. Jenningsí testimony at the trial regarding how she and her mother waited for Minor in the car the night of the crime--allegedly showing Minorís lack of concern-- was a recollection that came to her a month or two after the victimís death which she did not report until the trial. Similarly, her recollections as to whether Minor met her at the door with the victim in her arms or whether the victim was lying in the bed occurred after her initial statements to the police. Indeed, it was not until Jennings realized that she was herself a suspect in her sonís death that she "remembered" the events of that clearly.

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Jennings gave a statement on videotape telling a homicide officer that Minor did not kill his son.

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Jenningsí younger sister, Latia Pitts, also recalled new details about the night of the victimís death, despite the fact that she first gave a statement about those events some fourteen months after the fact. Although Pitts testified that Eíbious was in her sisterís right arm, and that Jenningsí left arm hit the door, she did not provide the piece of information to the police until only a few days before trial.

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Homicide officer Stan Bush testified at a bond hearing that he did not have any eye witnesses, physical evidence, or any type of evidence to prove that Minor committed capital murder. However, at an evidence hearing he testified that he obtained physical evidence--a stick with blood on it, evidence that was later determined to be false.

Other Legal Injustices

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The state did not allow Minor to properly and fully present his defense. Defense witnesses were not allowed to testify against Jennings in regard to her child abuse of other children, including her daughter Raquel.

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The defense was not allowed to impeach Officer Bush or Dr. Warner on their credibility, although they both had records of bad acts against them.

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Jennings had an uncle employed by the Tuscaloosa Sheriff Department, and an aunt employed by the Tuscaloosa Police Department. This had a major influence on Jennings not being arrested and charged with her sonís death.

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Minor was told by Officer Bush that if he gave a statement saying that his sonís death was an accident, he would get the District Attorney to drop the charges against him so that he could make bond prior to trial.

These are just some of the examples of the unfair nature of Willie Minorís conviction for the murder of a son that he loved.

For more information contact:

Lawyers:
Cynthia H. Bockman
2417 12th Street
Tuscaloosa, AL 35401
Phone (205) 750-0043
Fax (205) 750-0406

L. Dan Turberville
501 Church Street
Mobile, Al 36602-2004

Friend:
LaToya Franks
2685 22nd Street
Tuscaloosa, Al 35401
Phone (205) 349-2296